Want to stay up to date with Presidential news? Sign up for our mailing list.


Close

Want to stay up to date with Presidential news?
Like us on Facebook.

GovNews

House GOP Transportation Temper Tantrum Jeopardizing Our Economic Recovery

Nancy Pelosi's House Leadership Office (D) posted a Blog Post on May 21, 2012 | 11:07 am - Original Item - Comments (View)

House Republicans continue to choose politics over progress, regardless of the consequences for our economy.

After squandering more than ten weeks trying and failing to pass their partisan "my way or the highway" transportation bill, House Republicans still refuse to bring to the floor a bipartisan, Senate-passed bill that creates or saves 2 million jobs.  And their transportation temper tantrum is harming our economic recovery and jeopardizing American jobs.  From USA Today:

…As the economy picks up, the nation’s creaking infrastructure will increasingly struggle to handle the load. That will make products more expensive as businesses pay more for shipping or maneuver around roadblocks, and it will cause the nation to lose exports to other countries — both of which are expected to hamper the recovery…

“I call this a stealth attack on our economy,” says Janet Kavinoky, executive director of transportation and infrastructure for the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. “It’s not like an immediate crisis. It’s something that’s sneaking up on us.”

Freight bottlenecks and other congestion cost about $200 billion a year, or 1.6% of U.S. economic output, according to a report last year by Building America’s Future Educational Fund, a bipartisan coalition of elected officials. The chamber of commerce estimates such costs are as high as $1 trillion annually, or 7% of the economy…

Highways, meanwhile, suffer from Congress’s failure in recent years to assure long-term funding for a federal trust fund that pays for upgrades…

Among those affected is UPS. The giant courier says that if each of its 95,000 U.S. vehicles is delayed an average five minutes a day for a year — a realistic figure — it costs the company $103 million in added fuel costs, wages and lost productivity…

The nation’s 600,000 bridges are also falling behind. Nearly a quarter are classified as “structurally deficient” or “functionally obsolete,” according to the Federal Highway Administration.  As of the end of last year, more than one in 10 were closed or had weight limits that barred trucks. For Illinois corn grower Paul Taylor, such a restriction on the Pearl Street bridge in Kirkland means he must drive three extra miles to deliver his corn to a grain elevator, raising his costs by about 5 cents a bushel…

Privacy Policy - Site Copyright � 2011 Will Johnston, Content Belongs to Original Owner - Not Affiliated with any Government or State